Tag Archives: tutorial

Charting tuck stitches

Following on from Kate Atherley’s article on charting Brioche and Fisherman’s Rib Patterns I thought that it would be useful to detail how to chart Tuck stitches in Stitchmastery.

Tuck stitches are common in machine knitting patterns and you will find many examples of interesting tuck stitch patterns in commercially made knitwear. Sometimes these are repeating patterns as in this tuck stitch formed over three rows that forms a diamond effect;-

diamond tuck stitch pattern

 

Another very effective way of using tuck stitches is to incorporate a column of tuck stitches into a lace or cable pattern. The tuck stitches emphasize the vertical line or lines and can be a useful way of changing up a stitch pattern. In the example below two columns of stitches tucked over a single row transform a lace pattern.

tuck lace stitch pattern

Brioche stitches have been widely charted using Stitchmastery with the most common symbols used being;-

SymbolNameDescription
knitting symbol for brk - brioche knit
brk - brioche knitKnit the stitch that was slipped in the previous row together with its yarn over.
knitting symbol for brp - brioche purlbrp - brioche purlPurl the stitch that was slipped in the previous row together with its yarn over.
knitting symbol for yf sl1yoyf sl1yo - yarn forward slip stitch yarn overBring yarn to the front, slip the next stitch purl-wise, then bring the yarn to the back over the needle and the slipped stitch. The slipped stitch and yarn over are counted as 1 stitch.

Tuck stitches are essentially stitches that are worked as ‘yf sl1yo’ on multiple rows. Each row that a stitch is ‘tucked’ it is slipped purl-wise and an extra yarn over added. For example, the first time that a stitch is tucked, it is slipped and the first yarn over added. In all subsequent rows the slipped stitch and yarn over are then counted as one stitch and worked together. If a stitch is tucked for a second time on the following row, both the original stitch and its accompanying yarn over are slipped purl-wise and a second yarn over added. Likewise, if a stitch is tucked on a third row, it and its yarn overs will be slipped and another yarn over added. When a ‘brk’ (Brioche knit) or ‘brp’ (Brioche purl) stitch is to be worked it is worked on the original stitch plus ALL of its yarn overs.

Brioche is essentially a tuck stitch where the ‘yf sl1yo’ is worked only once before a ‘brk’ or ‘brp’ is worked.

When it comes to working tuck stitches there is an additional symbol, ‘yf sl1yo plus’ that is an elongated form of the ‘yf sl1yo’ symbol used in Brioche but can be used over several rows to make a symbol to represent a stitch that is ‘tucked’ multiple times.

In terms of Tuck knitting it can be helpful to redefine the symbols as;-

SymbolNameDescription
knitting symbol for brk - brioche knit
brk - brioche knitKnit the stitch that was slipped in the previous row together with all of its yarn overs.
knitting symbol for brp - brioche purlbrp - brioche purlPurl the stitch that was slipped in the previous row together with all of its yarn overs.
knitting symbol for yf sl1yoyf sl1yo - yarn forward slip stitch yarn overBring yarn to the front, slip the next stitch purl-wise, then bring the yarn to the back over the needle and the slipped stitch. The slipped stitch and yarn over are counted as 1 stitch.


yf sl1yo plus - yarn forward slip stitch yarn over plusBring yarn to the front, slip the next stitch and all its yarn overs purl-wise, then bring the yarn to the back over the needle and the slipped stitch. The slipped stitch and yarn overs are counted as 1 stitch.

Note that these re-definitions do not refer to the number of yarn overs on a stitch. Hence the number of symbols and stitch definitions needed is kept to a minimum and the key and chart are clear and simple;-

Chart for tuck stitches worked over three rows and staggered so that they form a diamond pattern

This is particularly useful when stitches are tucked over many rows;-

Chart for tuck stitches worked over six rows and staggered so that they form a diamond pattern

and when there are multiple tuck stitches in one pattern. For example, this stitch pattern has some tuck stitches worked over two rows whilst others are worked over 4 rows;-

Chart for tuck stitches worked over either two or four rows

Yet, the tuck symbols can be re-used which makes the resulting chart easy to read and the key short and simple.

Grading pattern repeats for garments and larger projects: Part 2 – guest post by Kate Atherley

In a previous column, I talked about ways to place and size pattern repeats for small projects like mittens and I’ve also talked about placement of larger patterns in garments. Now let’s tackle the question of smaller patterns in larger projects. This sort of thing: Amy Herzog’s February Fitted Pullover (a free pattern on Ravelry).Continue Reading

“Grading pattern repeats for garments and larger projects” – guest article by Kate Atherley

In a previous column, I talked about ways to place and size pattern repeats for small projects like mittens. But of course, pattern stitches are often used in garments too. There are three key differences when designing garments: you’ve got more stitches and therefore a larger canvas, different parts of the garment are more (orContinue Reading

“Customising the Written Instructions” – a guest post by Kate Atherley

One of my absolute favourite features of Stitchmastery is the ability to generate written instructions for charts. After all, not every knitter likes working from charts, and it’s good for a designer to provide the option of working another way. Every designer has their own style sheet, their own format for instructions, things like whetherContinue Reading

“Grading + Pattern Repeats” – a guest post by Kate Atherley

This lesson is little different than some of the others I’ve written: this one is designed to share a little less about how I use Stitchmastery and provide more of an insight into the design process itself. A problem that designers often struggle with – and one that you may well have encountered yourself withContinue Reading

Stitchmastery is 7 – tips and tricks for getting started knitting stranded colourwork

We’re enjoying seeing some progress on our knit-along (if you’re new to the blog, see our Stitchmastery is 7; Anniversary Mittens KAL and design-along! post for full information) and we’re delighted to hear that some intrepid knitters are considering trying stranded colourwork for the first time. We thought it might be helpful to point youContinue Reading

Stitchmastery is 7 – getting started with customising a mitten chart

Thank you to everyone who has sent kind messages for our 7th anniversary! Today we’re sharing some tips on how to start customising the mitten pattern if you’ve never used Stitchmastery before. First off, you’ll need to download Stitchmastery, which you can do for free in the demo version (which is the same software asContinue Reading

“On Short Rows” – a guest post by Kate Atherley

Short rows are an incredibly useful technique in knitting. They’re used to create curves, change stripes, turn corners and add bust shaping. Although simple in principle, they add a fair degree of complication to pattern instructions, and can be a particular challenge when building them into charted patterns. Stichmastery makes the key element of dealingContinue Reading

Customising the appearance of your stitches in Stitchmastery Version 3

This video explains the new method of customising stitches in Stitchmastery Version 3. If you’ve never created a User Library in Stitchmastery or need more help with the technical side of customising stitches (eg considering how much a stitch consumes and produces, and what the wrong side version should be) read the “Viewing and EditingContinue Reading

Creating your own User Stitch Libraries in Stitchmastery Version 3

  This video explains how to create your own user stitch library in Stitchmastery Version 3. Stitchmastery comes pre-loaded with two default Stitchmastery libraries (also available in German and Danish) which contain many stitches. As you may know, it is not possible to edit these default libraries, so if you want to customise the appearanceContinue Reading